The 10 Best Mountain Bike Tires Reviewed | MTB TIRES For 2019

A good mountain bike tire can make all the difference for your race, whether you’re out for fun or at your local race. Each mountain bike tire has designed according to the circumstances. An MTB tire is perfect for dry and sandy surfaces, while the second is ideal for muddy trails. Then theresome tires can handle a multitude of surfaces. So, how do you know which tires fit which surfaces and which conditions? We help clarify things in this mountain bike tire buyer’s guide.

THE BEST MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRES – Quick Selection

  1. SCHWALBE HANS DAMPF SNAKE SKIN MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE
  1. MAXXIS MAMMOTH EXO FAT BIKE TIRE
  1. MAXXIS MINION FBF DUAL COMPOUND EXO FOLDING BEAD FAT BIKE TIRE
  1. MICHELIN WILD RACER MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE
  1. SCHWALBE RACING RALPH SNAKE SKIN PACE STAR FOLDING
  1. CONTINENTAL TRAIL KING FOLD PROTECTION BIKE TIRE
  1. SCHWALBE ROCK RAZOR FOLDING BEAD SUPER GRAVITY TIRE
  1. MAXXIS ARDENT MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE
  1. MAXXIS IGNITOR MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE
  1. CONTINENTAL MOUNTAIN KING II FOLD PROTECTION BIKE TIRE

Comparison Chart of Top MTB Tires

MTB Reviews

1

SCHWALBE HANS DAMPF SNAKE SKIN MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Those who ride on a range of land

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 27.5 inches.

TUBELESS: The wheel is tubeless.

PROS: The large square rubber pavers offer excellent grip in all trail situations. The Trail Star compound with high control is perfect for Enduro and free ride.

CONS: Not Durable

Recognized as the expert in all trades, the Schwalbe Hans Dampf Evolution mountain tire combines snake-skin flanks with a Tubeless-Ready design for three distinct advantages on the trail: low weight, puncture protection and low rolling resistance. Snake skin protects the shoulders and sides of sharp rocks and glass. In addition, the conversion without a room is very simple.

2

MAXXIS MAMMOTH EXO FAT BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Winter riding and hard trail

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 26 inches.

TUBELESS: Yes, the tire is without a tube.

PROS: The low center tread continues to face confrontation.

CONS: Expensive and heavy

Maxxis Mammoth EXO was the brand’s first foray into the world of big bike tires and, like the old beast who named it, is ready to roam the mud, snow or sand you’ve put before you without hesitation. Unlike its name, however, we believe that this tire is there for the long term. Made with dual-compound fast-rolling rubber, the Mammoth will not be slowed down under harsh conditions with the low-profile tire.

3

MAXXIS MINION FBF DUAL COMPOUND EXO FOLDING BEAD FAT BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Winter runners tackling more challenging trails, high-end runners

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 26 inches.

TUBELESS: Yes, the tire is without a tube.

PROS: Specific front tire with rectangular buttons for excellent cornering grip and straight line tracking. There is also a carcass with two compounds, without an inner tube, with EXO protection between beads.

CONS: Expensive

The FBF Minion represents a progression in cycling by offering a specific tire at the front designed for the practice of trail. Featuring proven Minion DHF tread blocks, the FBF combines extreme cornering capabilities, low rolling resistance and thick tire volume for unmatched grip on uneven, loose surfaces.

4

MICHELIN WILD RACER MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Riders who stumble on stony courses

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 29 inches.

TUBELESS: The tire is tubeless ready.

PROS: Designed for use on hard terrain and offers better handling, greater efficiency thanks to a new tread design and a new architecture.

CONS: Expensive

Michelin Wild Racer tires feature a wide distribution of tread buttons to improve efficiency and provide excellent puncture resistance. Michelin Wild Racer tires are available in four widths. The larger the carcass, the better the tire can absorb shocks. The narrower the case, the lighter is the tire. You make your choice based on your type of riding.

5

SCHWALBE RACING RALPH SNAKE SKIN PACE STAR FOLDING

BEST FOR: Runners looking for a pace greater than toughness.

WHEEL SIZE: The tire is available in different sizes.

TUBELESS: The tire is ready for Tubeless.

PROS: Many grip edges in the center of the tread for super traction and excellent acceleration. Good rolling properties and extremely quiet.

CONS: Not very durable

The Ralph Racing is the optimal competition tire. The star of the MTB scene is also the optimal choice for the cyclo-cross competition. Schwalbe is a market leader in the design and manufacture of bicycle tires. Innovative designs and market specialization make their tires stand out for their quality and performance.

6

CONTINENTAL TRAIL KING FOLD PROTECTION BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Riders who find themselves on rocky ground

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 29 inches.

TUBELESS: The tire is tubeless ready.

PROS: The Continental Trail King has a light and agile footprint that, combined with its reasonable weight, rolls exceptionally well and adapts too many conditions.

CONS: Not good in muddy riding.

Trail King crisscrosses bike parks around the world with the top and the specially adapted Black Chili compound. The reinforced sidewall at the top reduces tire roll in tight bends and the special compound still wears on both rail and dry ground.

7

SCHWALBE ROCK RAZOR FOLDING BEAD SUPER GRAVITY TIRE

BEST FOR: Rolling slowly on stony trails

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 26 or 27.5 inches

TUBELESS: The tire is tubeless ready

PROS: The entire tire (not just the sidewalls) is covered with Snakeskin fabric. The weight is negligible – and it helps a lot.

CONS: Slippery

For the earliest instance, Schwalbe brought a “genuine” semi-slick to the severity and Enduro scenes. This is a very interesting option, especially on the rear wheel and on the very fast dry tracks. There is no better tire with a lower rolling resistance than Rock Razor.

8

MAXXIS ARDENT MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: Riders on a budget or less advanced bikers

WHEEL SIZE: The size of the wheel is 26 or 29 inches.

TUBELESS: The tire is tubeless ready.

PROS: The central tread, while ideal for braking and acceleration, also features slanted shoulder knobs for reduced rolling resistance.

CONS: Not tough and cheap

An aggressive tread in high-volume carcasses distinguishes the latest addition to Maxxis’ downhill and mountain disciplines. Designed with great traction in mind, the Ardent does not forget the runner. The central tread, though designed for braking and traction acceleration, also features sloped knobs to minimize rolling resistance. With a wide variety of sizes, the Ardent meets the needs of all mountain bikers.

9

MAXXIS IGNITOR MOUNTAIN BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: This tire is professional bikers

WHEEL SIZE: The wheel size is 26 inches

TUBELESS: The wheel is ready for tubeless

PROS: The tire has pentagonal directional design – front or rear. In addition, it has excellent multi-condition performance

CONS: Do not run wet mud and sand very well.

The Ignitor tread sculptures have been designed for the most demanding professional riders and have already won many World Cup victories. The well-spaced tread pattern provides low rolling resistance in straight lines, while sloped pentagonal knobs provide excellent cornering traction and medium hard ground.

10

CONTINENTAL MOUNTAIN KING II FOLD PROTECTION BIKE TIRE

BEST FOR: All Terrain

WHEEL SIZE: The wheel sizes are 26 and 27.5 inches

TUBELESS: The tire is without a tube.

PROS: Contains Continental’s revolutionary Black Chili Compound that reduces rolling resistance by 26%, improves grip by 30% and adds 5% more mileage to your tire.

CONS: Unpredictable grip of the tire

Mounting King II reinforces its dominance in the versatile track bike market. Excellent braking traction and optimum cornering are guaranteed in all conditions. The layout of the crampons was developed in collaboration with professional mountain bikers, creating an easy-to-ride, yet extremely versatile track tire.

What Should I Look For When Choosing My Mountain Bike Tire?

As far as mountain bike tires are concerned, there are several factors to understand that will enable you to make an informed buying decision.

Construction

TPI (Threads per Inch) is the carcass or casing of a tire and is made of parallel threads, usually nylon, rubber covered and oriented at a 45 degree angle from one heel to the other. Higher net densities create a softer tire with lower rolling resistance but less puncture protection. Higher threaded tires, ranging from 67 to 127 TPI, are used for cross-country skiing and light trails.

Lower threaded carcasses use coarser threads with more rubber around them. This gives a stiffer tire, but more durable. These 50 to 67 TPI counts provide a good balance for the heavier runway, all-mountain and downhill tires.

Folding beads are made of flexible material such as nylon, Kevlar or aramid. Beads that do not bend are made of steel.

Bead

The tire bead is the inside edge of the tire. The air pressure in the tire keeps the bead firmly in place in the rim and the tire on the wheel. The pearls do not stretch significantly.

For our purposes, beads can be considered as folding and not folding. Folding beads are made of flexible material such as nylon, Kevlar or aramid. Pearls that do not bend are made of steel and do not bend. Folding beads are much lighter than steel beads.

Sidewall Layers

Sidewall construction influences the tire’s flat resistance, weight, and ride quality. The thickness of the sidewall is determined by the number of layers of carcass or plies wrapped around the tire bead and the possible insertions between the plies. Inserts increase puncture protection, structural integrity, or both. Light and commonly used “brittle” layers are dense strips of nylon, Kevlar or aramid

These materials are light enough and flexible to minimize the impact on ride quality while providing protection. Cross-country tires will have little or no sidewall protection to save as much weight as possible. Nylon or thicker butyl inserts are used in off-road and downhill tires for increased flat compression resistance and stability at the expense of weight. Thinner and lighter tires rely on higher air pressure for the structure and flat resistance.

Width

Wider tires are heavier but provide more traction and the ability to withstand lower pressure. Larger tires also provide some suspension. For these reasons, tires from 2.25 “to 2.7”, and above are mainly used on the trail, all-mountain and downhill bikes. Narrower tires are lighter, run faster and require higher air pressure. 1.9 “to 2.1” tires are generally considered to be cross-country or track tires.

Puncture Resistance

Many attractive trails have jagged edges and thorns on the lookout. That’s why so many runners readily exchange some extra weight for a lot of extra protection.

Durable rubber helps, but the key to puncture protection lies in the case. Having a 2-ply tire is a tactic. Kevlar reinforcements and other protective materials are another. Some tires only protect the sidewalls, which are particularly vulnerable, while others are reinforced from bead to bead.